National Hospital Week: Where Health Comes First

Burgess Health Center kicked off this year’s National Hospital Week theme of “A Week of Thanks” with snacks, surprises, and prizes for all employees on Monday morning, May 11. Now more than ever, we need to thank all of the dedicated individuals — physicians, nurses, therapists, plant operations, food service workers, volunteers, managers, and so many more — for their contributions during this fight against COVID-19.

A hospital is more than a place where people go to heal; it is a part of the community that fosters health and represents hope. From providing treatment and comfort to the sick, to welcoming a new life into the world, hospitals are central to a healthy and optimistic community.

“National Hospital Week, first and foremost, is a celebration of people,” Fran Tramp, president of Burgess Health Center said. “We’re extremely proud of each member of our staff, and we recognize the important role they play in extending a sense of trust to our patients and our communities in this time of uncertainty.”

The nation’s largest health care event, National Hospital Week, dates back to 1921 when a magazine editor who hoped a community-wide celebration would alleviate public fears about hospitals suggested it. The celebration, launched in Chicago, succeeded in promoting trust and goodwill among members of the public and eventually spread to facilities across the country.

Burgess Public Health Reminds Residents Social Distancing is Important Outdoors, Too

Burgess Public Health thanks all residents that are following social distancing guidelines to help prevent the spread of COVID-19. It’s important to remember to follow these guidelines even when outside.

“We encourage residents to spend time outdoors when possible because it’s beneficial to mental health, and physical activity is a necessary part of a healthy lifestyle,” said Burgess Public Health Director Erin Brekke. “Everyone needs to continue following social distancing guidelines when outdoors because close contact, even outside, can spread the virus that causes COVID-19.”

When spending time outdoors, all people should:

  • Maintain social distancing by keeping a distance of at least 6 feet between yourself and anyone you encounter outdoors.
  • Spend time outdoors alone, or only with members of your household. This is not the time for team sports or recreation.
  • Avoid popular parks and trails that are frequently crowded.
  • Avoid touching surfaces like crosswalk buttons, park benches, etc. Carry hand sanitizer with you so you can clean your hands while outside, and be sure to wash your hands as soon as you return home.

In addition, everyone should follow these recommendations:

  • Stay home as much as possible.
  • If you must go out for essential errands like getting groceries or prescriptions, go alone if possible and maintain social distancing.
  • Practice social distancing by staying 6-feet away from other individuals. Avoid groups of more than 10 people.
  • Consider wearing a cloth face covering when running essential errands to protect others in case you are infected with COVID-19 and have no symptoms, or have not yet developed symptoms.
  • No travel outside of Iowa, even though we are a border community.

As of today, April 21, there are 7 cases of COVID-19 in Monona County. The Burgess Public Health Department continues to work closely with the Iowa Department of Public Health (IDPH), and other state and local partners to respond to this ongoing pandemic.

For up-to-date information on COVID-19, visit the IDPH webpage at https://idph.iowa.gov/Emerging-Health-Issues/Novel-Coronavirus and follow the department on Facebook at @IowaDepartmentOfPublicHealth and on Twitter at @IAPublicHealth.

One Additional Monona County Resident Tests Positive for COVID-19 Making Seven Total Cases

One Monona County Resident has tested positive for 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total number of cases to seven.

Information regarding this individual:

  • Female age 41-60. Not travel-related, community spread is suspected.

“These cases show just how important it is to follow the guidance given by the Iowa Department of Public Health and the CDC,” Stated Erin Brekke, Director of Burgess Public Health, “We all need to do our part to slow and stop the spread of this disease.”

  • Practice social distancing and avoid handshakes
  • Wash hands frequently with soap and water for at least 20 seconds each time, or use an alcohol-based sanitizer when soap and water are not available
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands
  • Avoid close contact with people that are sick
  • Covering coughs and sneezes with a tissue or elbow/upper arm
  • Staying home when you or a family member are ill
  • Call first if you need to see a healthcare provider
  • Routinely cleaning frequently touched surfaces such as doorknobs, light switches, and countertops with an effective cleaner

 

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Burgess Accepts Bomgaars Ladies’ Night Donation

In late October, Bomgaars held a night of festive fun and shopping for ladies, and earlier this month, the radiology department at Burgess Health Center received a generous donation.

Bomgaars joined with local cancer centers and hospitals to raise awareness of women’s health issues and passed along a 20% discount for the ladies in attendance on October 27, 2019, from 5-8 p.m.  A donation of the evening’s total sales was pledged back into the community to help local agencies.

“We are grateful to have the support from our local Bomgaar’s store and the ladies that came out to enjoy the discounts,” Jenny Coble, Director of Radiology stated. “This community rallies when it’s for a good cause, and in this case, cancer screening and women’s health.”

The donation of $306.11 is earmarked to support mammography services at Burgess Health Center. Breast cancer cannot be prevented; however, Burgess Health Center continues to provide and invest in the latest technologies, education, and support services for early detection.

Burgess Public Health to Residents: Together We’re Stronger

The Burgess Public Health Department reminds residents that although they are spending more time away from friends and family because of social distancing, state, county and local leaders recognize and appreciate the vital role they serve in stopping the spread of COVID-19.

“This unprecedented time is not easy,” said Burgess Public Health Director, Erin Brekke. “We want everyone to know that the actions they are taking –  staying away from groups of people and keeping a 6-foot distance from other individuals – are important and make a difference.” These actions, known as social distancing, help stop the spread of COVID-19.

While physical health is a primary focus now, mental health should also be a priority. “Spending most of your time at home means more television and social media, and that often means an overload of information about COVID-19. People may feel lonely and anxious. This is normal, but there are steps we can take to help these non-physical results of COVID-19,” said Brekke.

  • Use the phone, computer or other devices to connect electronically with friends and family.
  • Take time to unplug. It’s important to stay informed, but you can do that by checking in with trusted sources a few times a day.
  • Eat healthy meals and find ways to be active. Be sure to eat regular, healthy meals and make time to move.
  • Find ways to support others. West Central Community Action at (712) 423-2603.
  • If you need to talk to someone, visit YourLifeIowa.org, where you can online chat. You can also text YourLifeIowa 24/7 at 855-895-8398 or call 855-581-8111. All services are confidential and free.

Burgess Public Health thanks all the local businesses, schools, essential service workers, health care providers, coalitions, churches and individuals for doing their part during this COVID-19 pandemic.

As a reminder, all residents should:

  • Stay home as much as possible, leaving only for essential errands like groceries or medication.
  • Stay home completely when even mildly ill (the kind of illness that normally wouldn’t prevent you from your everyday activities)
  • Cover coughs and sneezes with a tissue or your elbow/upper arm.
  • Wash hands frequently with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.

Symptoms of COVID-19 include cough, fever (100.4 or greater) and shortness of breath. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, you should call your health care provider before going into the office. The provider may have special instructions for you and will determine if you should be tested. As we see cases rise in Iowa, Monona County must not relax as we know COVID-19 is still a concern in our area.

For up-to-date information on COVID-19, visit the IDPH webpage at https://idph.iowa.gov/Emerging-Health-Issues/Novel-Coronavirus and follow the department on Facebook at @IowaDepartmentOfPublicHealth and on Twitter at @IAPublicHealth.

National Child Abuse Prevention Month in April

To kick off Child Abuse Prevention Month, the Learning for Life Program, through Burgess Health Center, set up pinwheel gardens around the county.  Glistening pinwheels were placed outside the front of the Burgess Health Center, Monona County Courthouse, Soldier Community Center, Fisher Whiting Memorial Library, and at the Whiting and West Monona Elementary Schools. The pinwheels are the national symbol for child abuse and neglect prevention. As you see these pinwheels, we hope you are able to take a moment to recognize how you can help to prevent child abuse and neglect by supporting and nurturing the families in our community. Together we can continue to make Monona County a happy, healthy, and thriving county—starting with our children! Please like our Facebook Page, Learning for Life at Burgess Health Center, to learn more about how you can help!

If you or a friend would like to learn how to participate in educational early childhood home visits that will help your child’s growth and development, please contact Sara Keenan or Debie Lahr with Burgess Health Center’s Learning for Life Program, at 712-420-0054.  The Learning for Life Program is a free home visiting program for families with children prenatal through kindergarten entry. The Learning for Life Program is funded by grants from the Harrison, Monona and Shelby Early Childhood Iowa Board and the Harrison, Monona and Shelby Decategorization Board and ICAPP grant funding.

One Additional Monona County Resident Tests Positive for COVID-19 Making Six Total Cases

One Monona County Resident has tested positive for 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total number of cases to six.

Information regarding this individual:

  • Age 81+ Not travel-related, close contact to a person who tested positive

“These cases show just how important it is to follow the guidance given by the Iowa Department of Public Health and the CDC,” Stated Erin Brekke, Director of Burgess Public Health, “We all need to do our part to slow and stop the spread of this disease.”

  • Practice social distancing and avoid handshakes
  • Wash hands frequently with soap and water for at least 20 seconds each time, or use an alcohol-based sanitizer when soap and water are not available
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands
  • Avoid close contact with people that are sick
  • Covering coughs and sneezes with a tissue or elbow/upper arm
  • Staying home when you or a family member are ill
  • Call first if you need to see a healthcare provider
  • Routinely cleaning frequently touched surfaces such as doorknobs, light switches, and countertops with an effective cleaner.

Three Monona County Residents Test Positive for COVID-19 Making Five Total Cases

Three Monona County Residents have tested positive for 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total number of cases to five.

Information regarding the three individuals:

– Person 1 – Age 61-80 Not travel-related, close contact to a person who tested positive

– Person 2 – Age 18-40 Not travel-related, close contact to a person who tested positive

– Person 3 – Age 0-17 Not travel-related, close contact to a person who tested positive

“These cases show just how important it is to follow the guidance given by the Iowa Department of Public Health and the CDC for social distancing and isolation when you are sick,” stated Erin Brekke Director of Burgess Public Health. “We all need to do our part to slow and stop the spread of this disease.”

– Practice social distancing and avoid handshakes
– Wash hands frequently with soap and water for at least 20 seconds each time, or use an alcohol-based sanitizer when soap and water are not available
– Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands
– Avoid close contact with people that are sick
– Covering coughs and sneezes with a tissue or elbow/upper arm
– Staying home when you or a family member are ill
– Call first if you need to see a healthcare provider
-Routinely cleaning frequently touched surfaces with an effective cleaner.